Body Ecology Diet

...recovering your health, rebuilding your immunity.

Quinoa: An In-Depth Guide to the Amazing Health Benefits, Uses, and Other Darned Interesting Facts of this Beloved Body Ecology "Grain"

 

by BodyEcology.com 

Over 5000 years ago the Incas cultivated the grain-like seed quinoa as one of their staple crops.

Now science has shown that this humble "grain" is actually a superfood! Quinoa is full of phytonutrients, antioxidants AND can even help balance your blood sugar.

As a result, people everywhere are discovering the benefits of quinoa, a delicious whole "grain" that is easy to digest, full of high quality protein and fiber, and can form the basis for delicious Body Ecology meals.

You've probably heard that you should eat whole grains, but try the gluten free grain-like seed called "quinoa" instead of wheat. Quinoa provides more amino acids, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrients than most other grains!

"Quin-WHAT?"
Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is not a grain; it is actually a seed and related to the spinach family. When cooked, quinoa is light, fluffy, slightly crunchy and subtly flavored. It actually cooks and tastes like a grain, making it an excellent replacement for grains that are difficult to digest or feed candida (a systemic fungal infection).

But its flavor is only part of why quinoa is such an amazing "supergrain."

Some of the nutrients in quinoa include:

Compared to other grains, quinoa is higher in calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, iron, copper, manganese, and zinc than wheat, barley, or corn.2

Studies have shown that quinoa has documented health benefits too!

Quinoa, in its whole grain form, may be effective in preventing and treating these conditions:3

Researchers attribute the health benefits of quinoa to its complete nutritional makeup.

Quinoa is close to one of the most complete foods in nature because it contains amino acids, enzymes, vitamins and minerals, fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrients.

Quinoa: A Body Ecology Grain

We recommend quinoa because it does not feed fungal and bacterial infections in your body (and doctors estimate that 8 in 10 Americans have fungal infections, like candia!)1.

Quinoa has other qualities that make it an ideal "grain":

To learn more about Body Ecology "grains" read The Risks of Consuming Typical Grains & the Healthy Grains to Choose Instead.

Quinoa in the Kitchen

Quinoa is especially easy to cook and can be enjoyed year-round because it's versatile and light. You can use it in warming winter soups or refreshing summer salads.

Make sure you rinse your quinoa and then soak for at least 8 hours to remove the phytic acid that can prevent proper digestion.

We like to add B.E. Wholegrain Liquid to the soaking water to add some beneficial bacteria and further soften the "grains" before cooking.

Cook quinoa 15 minutes or less, and it's ready to mix with a variety of ingredients to create diverse and delicious meals.

Here are some ideas for your next quinoa meal:

Quinoa, a delicious gluten free grain-like seed, is full of nutrients and acts as a prebiotic to feed the healthy microflora in your intestions. Get high quality, organic quinoa delivered to your door today!

Quinoa makes a great breakfast meal and can be enjoyed in its wholegrain form or try quinoa flakes hot cereal as a wonderful replacement for oatmeal!

We also recommend eating quinoa in the evening. It is the ideal easy-to-digest food to eat in the evening because it encourages a good night's sleep.

To aid your digestion even more, be sure to add fermented foods and drinks, like cultured vegetables and probiotic liquids.

Quinoa can be your superfood: regulating your blood sugar, enhancing elimination, and keeping your heart healthy. Add this "mother grain" to your diet and enjoy the health benefits of quinoa, just like the Incas did thousands of years ago.

 

Sources:
Quinoa, WHFoods.org.
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=142
2The Largely Unknown Health Epidemic Affecting Almost ALL Americans, BodyEcology.com.
http://www.bodyecology.com/06/12/28/unknown_health_epidemic.php
3 Oelke, E.A., et al, "Quinoa," Hort.Purdue.edu.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/afcm/quinoa.html
4 Quinoa, WHFoods.org.
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=142